Saturday, June 07, 2003

Thanks to Liudvikas Bukys for this background on "blogos" outside of English:

"Blogos" in Lithuanian means "bad", plural adjective, with about as many variations in context as English: "gone bad", "badly behaved", "feeling bad or ill".

Wow: i guess i should have hired that high-priced name consultant before picking Blogos (real background here). I wouldn't have guessed there were Lithuanian speakers reading my blog. The world really is shrinking.


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Yippee, my blog is now the first thing that comes up when querying Google for "blogos". I guess that makes me the most popular blogos on the web.

You might think that should be self-evident, but my site accounts for only a small percentage of the 2000+ hits on what i used to think would be a unique term. Most of the rest are in Polish, Lithuanian, and other languages i can't make heads or tails of. Maybe blogos just means "blog" in these languages?!? If anybody has a clue, please let me know.


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In Sean McGrath's typology, i guess i'm more of a doc head than a data head. There's real power when you pair structure with readability.
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You know your field is starting to emerge from obscurity when it gets reported in Wired News. Pick a Language, Any Language talks about the new DARPA "Surprise Language Evaluation", which aims to get researchers in computational linguistics (including my group at BBN Technologies) rapidly up to speed on a new language. Surprise! it's Hindi. Alas, no mention of BBN in the article.


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Something useful from Waypath: a pointer to Wordspy, which tracks new words and word usages. For example, here's the scoop on underload syndrome, "Ill health or depression caused by a lack of challenges or stimulation at work."

Alas, i couldn't find GoogleMass there (yet).


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New discovery by backtracing Technorati links to Blogos to Tectorum: something called Waypath. You give it a URL and it does some kind of word-based analysis to produce a list of other blogs that are "related". Doesn't do much for my top-level link (which i guess means i'm incoherent), but it provides some interesting links at lower levels. Endless hours of distraction and scattered attention!
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Tommy T commented on the "Word of the day: Mondegreen" post:

I was thinking from the Mondegreen concept about intrinsically Christian song titles, i.e., songs that are secular in thought, pattern, and lyrical content, but when considered in base happiness mode, have all the underpinnings of spiritual contentment.

"It's a Wonderful World"
"Life's Been Good to Me So Far"
"Wind beneath my Wings"
"I Can see Clearly Now"
"I Get By With a Little Help from My Friends"
"All You Need is Love"

Now, without mentioning the fact that God is alive and well - caring about us intimately, as explicitly displayed in the life of Jesus, the Christ, or in the ongoing counsel of the Paraclete -  these songs still (despite any attempt by the authors/composers otherwise)create in me a sense of wonder about this thing called life, and God's invisible, yet ever present involvement in it.

It's a good point: we see things that we might otherwise miss when we view life with eyes enlightened by God, and we find his grace in places that might surprise us.

By the way, that's a pretty sharp looking picture, Tommy.


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