Saturday, January 08, 2005

BiblioBlog is aggregating content about biblical studies, which seems like a good idea to me, especially since they've included Blogos. I'm afraid my favicon looks even cheesier than usual on their overview: i've really got to get myself something better than the Apache default.

In return, i've added their badge to the bottom of my page. Be warned if you want to cut-and-paste that their HTML seems to be a little garbled, however (though it's easily fixed if you know HTML).


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Read Pericope 8: Mary visits Elizabeth.

I'm struck by the fact that Mary stayed three months with Elizabeth. I can only imagine the rich conversations and interaction they had during that time, imagining what God was about to do. Luke notes that Mary traveled there "with haste", perhaps to seek to counsel of her older relative. Since Elizabeth was already six months along when Gabriel's visitation let Mary know of the coming birth of Jesus (pericope 7), this would have been her last trimester, though we don't know if Mary stayed for the birth or not 


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Christianity Today has an interview with sociologist Christian Smith discussing his findings about the beliefs of contemporary 13- to 17-year olds. In general, "teens reflect the world more than they rebel against it". It's surprising that most kids in this group aren't opposed to the religious views of their parents. At the same time, they really don't want to be perceived as "too religious", particularly in the social sense of somebody who stands out and seems weird. At the same time, they are "incredibly inarticulate about their faith, their religious beliefs and practices."

... it really struck us in our research that very few teens are getting a chance to practice talking about their faith. We were dumbfounded by the number of teens who told us we were the first adults who had asked them what they believed. One said: "I do not know. No one has ever asked me that before." (italics mine)

The whole article is worth a thoughtful read, particularly Smith's discussion of  "Moralistic Therapeutic Deism", which he sees as the de facto faith of many teens, including those from evangelical Christian backgrounds.


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