Thursday, October 30, 2003

Are you a minister/clergy by training? No.

1.) How has your use of the Internet (specifically blogging) provided you a platform to present your ideas?

The big win to me is reducing publishing costs (both technical expertise and $$) down close to zero. So if i have something worth saying (always a big if!), i can. And because it's the Web, it's dynamic and hyperlinked.

2.) Each of you have developed a sort of online 'status' and gained an audience, how did you gain credibility view of others?

I'm not sure i do have an audience! But i try to focus what i blog about to fairly specific subjects, not say too many stupid things, and respond to people's interest when it's expressed (which is not often enough, in my experience). When i can say something new or interesting, that's a plus.

3.) What criteria do you use to select your blog roll (specifically Christian bloggers--we all have 'non-Christians' on our blog rolls)?

Main criteria: am i interested in what they say? I make a point of including people who have links to me, or have commented on posts, because reciprocating seems like a blogger value. I make no attempt to filter out 'non-Christian' blogs: heck, i even bookmark 'non-Christian' websites!

4.) Why do you blog? If you want, please describe your process. Do you consider it 'spiritual'? Why or why not?

I'm currently dreaming about some projects, and trying to find other people interested in them. But i also sometimes blog about spiritual things for no other reason than i thought about them. One reason is that expressing them in words helps me understand them better myself, and validate or reject them. I've often thought i had some brilliant idea, gone to write it down, and realized either i didn't really believe it, or it wasn't so brilliant on second look. I don't consider blogging any more (or less) spiritual than writing an email or talking to someone.

(in response to the update) All forms of expression are susceptible to syncretism, blogging included. There are plenty of Christians with reformed habits but secular hearts: that becomes clear when you talk to them about what their ultimate values are, how they make decisions, personal integrity when nobody's looking, etc. And i'm sometimes like that too.

5.) In your opinion, how is spiritual blogging similar to or different from preaching?

I understand preaching primarily as motivating others. I don't do much blogging like that: it's not really my strong suit. Furthermore, in blogspace, you don't really know who your audience is anyway, so i'm not sure who i'd be motivating. Others might do this effectively, though.

I blog at Blogos, http://www.semanticbible.com/blogos/.


7:44:01 PM #  comment []

Tim Bednar of e-church is surveying Christian bloggers in the content of a white paper he's writing on spiritual blogging.  Here are his five questions: he'd like you to post your answers to his site (and you can read other people's answers: hi DJ!).

Preface: Are you a minister/clergy by training? (y/n) If yes, give your credentials?

1.) How has your use of the Internet (specifically blogging) provided you a platform to present your ideas?

2.) Each of you have developed a sort of online 'status' and gained an audience, how did you gain credibility view of others? >

3.) What criteria do you use to select your blog roll (specifically Christian bloggers--we all have 'non-Christians' on our blog rolls)?

4.) Why do you blog? If you want, please describe your process. Do you consider it 'spiritual'? Why or why not? (Please read my update at the bottom of this post.)

5.) In your opinion, how is spiritual blogging similar to or different from preaching?

Please put your answers in the comments or email them to timbednar[at]e-church.com. MAKE SURE YOU PROVIDE THE ADDRESS FOR YOUR BLOG.


7:21:36 PM #  comment []

From the Youth Specialities newletter:

Early this morning, Thursday, October 30, we lost a friend, a father, an inspiration. Co-founder and owner of Youth Specialties (YS), Mike Yaconelli, was in a fatal car accident in northern California late Wednesday evening.

The number of lives touched by Mike is beyond what we could even estimate. He is the father of modern youth ministry in many minds. Through his books, speaking engagements, and YS events, he has ministered to untold thousands all over the world.

Mike dedicated his life to what God had called him to do. He believed in youth ministry, and did all he could to equip youth workers to change the lives of students. He lived with a passion that was unmatched. He was the incarnation of his book titles, Dangerous Wonder and Messy Spirituality; he lived a life of wonder and amazement at God's grace. He never claimed to be perfect; he just lived as he was­a man after God's own heart.

In this time of grief and confusion, as we all deal with our loss, it is the hope of the YS family that you will reflect on how God used Mike to touch your life. Please keep Mike's wife, Karla, his father, Ernie, his children and grandchildren, and the YS staff in your prayers, as we deal with this painful loss.

There is more information on the YS site. As more information is available regarding services, we will update you on the site.

Youth Specialties staff

Mike's book Dangerous Wonder was a great invitation to me to experience the adventure of who God is. He will be missed.


4:31:56 PM #  comment []